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How to start PanStamp Project
02-11-2014, 03:25 AM
Post: #1
How to start PanStamp Project
Hi guys,

I'm a software developer with an interest in home automation. The stuff I can buy here in the Netherlands is very expensive or doesn't meet my requirements, so I decided to try and build some hardware myself.. Smile

I stumbeled across PanStamps and mainly the size made me decide to try it out. But I'm a Java developer during the day so all this embedded stuff is a little out of my comfort zone..
But I'm confident I can master the basics of programming with Arduino, so I'm going to give it a try.

At first I want to do some basic pin in/out operations with the PanStamp, I want to support a relais and a physical switch. I'm really far away from production ready hardware but already I'm struggling with the basics. For example, I know it's easiest to start with a breadboard but I'm not sure what I need to get a basic development setup..

I'll get a PanStick and some PanStamps from the web store but I'm not sure what to get next to a breadboard, some advice is really welcome, mainly for the following items:

- How to power the stamps?
- Any suggestions for a relais (to switch a 230V light for example)?

Finally a little context, I basically want to create a wireless switch which is also able to be operated manually, I figured this should be possible with just a panStamp (no Arduino)..
The plan is to switch the relais when the stamp receives a wireless signal and send a signal if the physical switch is toggeled..
Like I said, I'm a total noob on the hardware side of it, so if anyone feels this is impossible I like to know now.. Tongue

Thanks in advance,

\Chris
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02-11-2014, 06:50 PM
Post: #2
RE: How to start PanStamp Project
Welcome Chris.

(02-11-2014 03:25 AM)cquach Wrote:  - How to power the stamps?

I'm guessing that you don't have the basic instruments at home. If this is the case I recommend you to buy some basic stuff like a variable power supply. You can buy low-cost equipment from any electronic store.

panStamps are powered at 2.6-3.6V so simply set your PSU to provide 3.3V and feed your panStamp on the breadboard. On the other side, just plug one of your panStamps on a panStick connected to your computer.

(02-11-2014 03:25 AM)cquach Wrote:  - Any suggestions for a relais (to switch a 230V light for example)?

output-board is maybe the best example. You can even use it without changing a single line of code since this sketch is made to control external relais. However, if you want to understand how the program works I recommend you to do some basic program like blinking a LED. This basic example is indeed the basis for switching heavier loads. digitalRead/digitalWrite is your friend.

Also take a look at our wiki where the protocol and Arduino libraries are explained. This is an important step mainly if you want to develop your own application fro panStamp or develop your own software for a computer.

(02-11-2014 03:25 AM)cquach Wrote:  Finally a little context, I basically want to create a wireless switch which is also able to be operated manually, I figured this should be possible with just a panStamp (no Arduino)..
The plan is to switch the relais when the stamp receives a wireless signal and send a signal if the physical switch is toggeled..
Like I said, I'm a total noob on the hardware side of it, so if anyone feels this is impossible I like to know now.. Tongue

Chris, panStamp was made for purposes like this one Wink

Daniel Berenguer
http://www.panstamp.com
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02-12-2014, 01:53 AM (This post was last modified: 02-12-2014 01:55 AM by tochinet.)
Post: #3
RE: How to start PanStamp Project
Welcome Chris ! A panstamp can do everything an Arduino can, and more !

I'd suggest you buy a "breadboard" indeed, and plug one panstamp in. There are now very small power supplies that fit the breadboard, giving you one 5V rail and one 3V3 rail, themselved powered by a mini or micro USB. that's probably the cheapest alternative, and also doesn't requires playing with thick/thin wires/soldering.

I'm a "heavy user" of the output board, very nice, and it fits a standard electric fusebox (DIN rail). I use the panstick to "monitor" activity, and I'd also recommend (if you have a bit of budget) the battery board for your "wireless button", so you can move it across the house.

I guarantee you'll get soon a lot of fun modifying the binout sketch to receive the SWAP command from the battery board. This is C++, so you should quickly feel at home.

A reference for the power supply : http://www.seeedstudio.com/depot/5V33V-B...p-566.html
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02-12-2014, 07:29 AM
Post: #4
RE: How to start PanStamp Project
you can also connect the panstick with a few wires to the breadboard. this allows to power and programm the panstamp directly on the breadboard and debug with the serial console. this is very convenient for development Smile
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02-15-2014, 12:23 AM
Post: #5
RE: How to start PanStamp Project
Thanks for the suggestions guys..
I'll get some basic hardware and report back.. Smile
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04-18-2017, 11:34 PM
Post: #6
RE: How to start PanStamp Project
Hello,

I have read your below reply.. Can you please draw schematic for the same and send me.. or guide me on this pls...

Ajith

(02-12-2014 07:29 AM)justme1968 Wrote:  you can also connect the panstick with a few wires to the breadboard. this allows to power and programm the panstamp directly on the breadboard and debug with the serial console. this is very convenient for development Smile
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04-19-2017, 12:11 AM
Post: #7
RE: How to start PanStamp Project
Ajith, this is an old thread. Not sure what you mean. But I would tend to change my recommendation for a beginner

If you want to go with 220V relays, forget about the breadboards, there could be danger of fire, and modules with dangling wires are no ideal.
The output-board is much, much safer.

The relay board schematics are available on the site, see https://github.com/panStamp/kicad/blob/m...-board.pdf

There is also a newer nice remote control with buttons in the shop that would allow you to control some of the relays.
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