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Hello from East Coast, USA!
06-21-2015, 04:31 AM
Post: #1
Hello from East Coast, USA!
Hello Everyone!

I've got a pile of applications for these puppies..

The first involves two radios, two computers and SLIP+SSH for audio/txt comms.

Fully proto-typed with TTL serial between each computer, just received my radios yesterday, so now will replace the serial lines with the two radios. Just need to add HEX conversion on each side of the radio and should be functional with the vanilla sketch! The two systems will effectively be on a private LAN together, and the possibilities are endless!

** Side thought, I assume the design intent behind HEX is to prevent accidentally placing the modem into control mode (+++) during normal operation..??

- Scott
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06-21-2015, 06:49 AM
Post: #2
RE: Hello from East Coast, USA!
Welcome Scott,

The serial protocol is ASCII, I mean that you can easily read the wireless traffic from any kind of serial terminal. However, bytes are HEX-formatted.

Daniel Berenguer
http://www.panstamp.com
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06-21-2015, 09:39 AM
Post: #3
RE: Hello from East Coast, USA!
Yes, I understand.. I was just interested in why hex format was chosen, and I believe it is so the radio's don't accidentally change into control mode. Beyond that, I'm converting the bytes to and from hex on either end, so SLIP has no knowledge of the radio systems, a serial bridge, excellent stuff!

(06-21-2015 06:49 AM)dberenguer Wrote:  Welcome Scott,

The serial protocol is ASCII, I mean that you can easily read the wireless traffic from any kind of serial terminal. However, bytes are HEX-formatted.
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06-21-2015, 06:43 PM
Post: #4
RE: Hello from East Coast, USA!
Well, binary coding is the most efficient way to transport data. For example, byte 0x1A needs two bytes in ASCII format, first character "1" and second character "A". In summary, twice the length in ASCII than in binary format. In wireless ISM communications we usually want the packets to be as short as possible in order to minimize the risk of collisions, save current and also to take advantage of the limited maximum length of packets.

Daniel Berenguer
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06-22-2015, 01:40 AM
Post: #5
RE: Hello from East Coast, USA!
Got it. That makes good sense.

Thanks for taking the time to respond.

(06-21-2015 06:43 PM)dberenguer Wrote:  Well, binary coding is the most efficient way to transport data. For example, byte 0x1A needs two bytes in ASCII format, first character "1" and second character "A". In summary, twice the length in ASCII than in binary format. In wireless ISM communications we usually want the packets to be as short as possible in order to minimize the risk of collisions, save current and also to take advantage of the limited maximum length of packets.
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